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Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2016 Jun;65:142-56. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2016.03.026. Epub 2016 Mar 31.

Structural and functional neural adaptations in obstructive sleep apnea: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis.

Author information

  • 1Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran; National Brain Mapping Center, Shahid Beheshti University (General & Medical campus), Tehran, Iran.
  • 2Sleep and Brain Plasticity Centre, Department of Neuroimaging, IOPPN, King's College and Imperial College, London, UK.
  • 3Institute of Clinical Neuroscience & Medical Psychology, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany; Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany.
  • 4Division of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Electronic address: Sepehryaa@alumni.ubc.ca.
  • 5Department of Physics, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA.
  • 6Research Imaging Institute, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USA; South Texas Veterans Health Care System,San Antonio, TX 78229, USA.
  • 7Sleep and Brain Plasticity Centre, Department of Neuroimaging, IOPPN, King's College and Imperial College, London, UK; Academic Unit of Sleep and Breathing, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, UK; NIHR Respiratory Disease Biomedical Research Unit at the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust and Imperial College London, UK.
  • 8Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address: hakhazaie@gmail.com.
  • 9Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.

Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common multisystem chronic disorder. Functional and structural neuroimaging has been widely applied in patients with OSA, but these studies have often yielded diverse results. The present quantitative meta-analysis aims to identify consistent patterns of abnormal activation and grey matter loss in OSA across studies. We used PubMed to retrieve task/resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometry studies. Stereotactic data were extracted from fifteen studies, and subsequently tested for convergence using activation likelihood estimation. We found convergent evidence for structural atrophy and functional disturbances in the right basolateral amygdala/hippocampus and the right central insula. Functional characterization of these regions using the BrainMap database suggested associated dysfunction of emotional, sensory, and limbic processes. Assessment of task-based co-activation patterns furthermore indicated that the two regions obtained from the meta-analysis are part of a joint network comprising the anterior insula, posterior-medial frontal cortex and thalamus. Taken together, our findings highlight the role of right amygdala, hippocampus and insula in the abnormal emotional and sensory processing in OSA.

KEYWORDS:

Amygdala; Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI); Hippocampus; Insula; Obstructive sleep apnea; Voxel-based morphometry (VBM)

PMID:
27039344
PMCID:
PMC5103027
DOI:
10.1016/j.neubiorev.2016.03.026
[PubMed - in process]
Free PMC Article

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