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Neuroscience. 2016 Jun 14;325:89-99. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2016.03.056. Epub 2016 Mar 31.

The role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) in brain development, maturation and neuroplasticity.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland. Electronic address: tropead@tcd.ie.

Abstract

Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) is a phylogenetically ancient neurotrophic hormone with crucial roles to play in CNS development and maturation. Recently, IGF-1 has been shown to have potent effects on cellular neuroplasticity. Neuroplasticty refers to the adaptive changes made by the CNS in the face of changing functional demands and is crucial in processes such as learning and memory. IGF-1, signaling through its glycoprotein receptor (IGF-1R), and canonical signaling pathways such as the PI3K-Akt and Ras-Raf-MAP pathways, has potent effects on cellular neuroplasticity in the CNS. In the present review, the role of IGF-1 in brain development is reviewed, followed by a detailed discussion of the role played by IGF in cellular neuroplasticity in the CNS. Findings from models of perturbed and reparative plasticity detailing the role played by IGF-1 are discussed, followed by the electrophysiological, structural and functional evidence supporting this role. Finally, the post-lesion and post-injury roles played by IGF-1 are briefly evaluated. We discuss the putative neurobiology underlying these changes, reviewing recent evidence and highlighting areas for further research.

KEYWORDS:

CNS; IGF-1; development; plasticity

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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