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Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2016 Aug;40:97-102. doi: 10.1016/j.copbio.2016.02.028. Epub 2016 Mar 29.

The effect of NOD2 on the microbiota in Crohn's disease.

Author information

1
University of Delaware, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Newark, DE 19716, United States.
2
University of Delaware, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Newark, DE 19716, United States. Electronic address: cgrimes@udel.edu.

Abstract

Recent advancements toward the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) indicate great promise for long-term remission. CD patients suffer from a complex host of dysregulated interactions between their innate immune system and microbiome. The most predominant link to the onset of CD is a genetic mutation in the innate immune receptor nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing 2 (NOD2). NOD2 responds to the presence of bacteria and stimulates the immune response. Mutations to NOD2 promote low diversity and dysbiosis in the microbiome, leading to impaired mucosal barrier function. Current treatments suppress the immune response rather than enhancing the function of this critical protein. New progress toward stabilizing NOD2 signaling through its interactions with chaperone proteins holds potential in the development of novel CD therapeutics.

PMID:
27035071
PMCID:
PMC5820027
DOI:
10.1016/j.copbio.2016.02.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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