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ILAR J. 2016;57(1):24-33. doi: 10.1093/ilar/ilv047.

Role of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in Lymphomagenesis--Going Alone or Colluding?

Author information

1
Sarah Kaye, BVSc, is a small animal clinician with the Animal Welfare League Qld Inc. in The Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. Wenqi Wang, BVSc, PhD, is a postdoctoral fellow affiliated with the School of Veterinary Science at University of Queensland at Gatton in Australia. Craig Miller, DVM, is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology & Pathology at Colorado State University in FortCollins, Colorado. Alicia McLuckie, BVSc, is a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Sydney in NSW, Australia, Julia A. Beatty, BSc, BVetMed, PhD, FANZCVs (feline med), is a professor in the Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Sydney in NSW, Australia. Chris K. Grant, PhD, DSc, is founder and CEO of Custom Monoclonals International Corp. in West Sacramento, California. Sue VandeWoude, DVM, MS, DACLAM, is a professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology & Pathology at Colorado State University and Associate Dean for Research in the College of Veterinary & Biomedical Sciences at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado. Helle Bielefeldt-Ohmann, DVM, PhD, is a senior lecturer in the School of Veterinary Science at the University of Queensland at Gatton, an affiliate senior lecturer in the School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences at the University of Queensland at St. Lucia, and an investigator at the Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre at the University of Queensland in St. Lucia, Australia.

Abstract

Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a naturally occurring lentivirus of domestic and nondomestic feline species. Infection in domestic cats leads to immune dysfunction via mechanisms similar to those caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and, as such, is a valuable natural animal model for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in humans. An association between FIV and an increased incidence of neoplasia has long been recognized, with frequencies of up to 20% in FIV-positive cats recorded in some studies. This is similar to the rate of neoplasia seen in HIV-positive individuals, and in both species neoplasia typically requires several years to arise. The most frequently reported type of neoplasia associated with FIV infection is lymphoma. Here we review the possible mechanisms involved in FIV lymphomagenesis, including the possible involvement of coinfections, notably those with gamma-herpesviruses.

KEYWORDS:

cat; feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV); feline leukemia virus (FeLV); gamma-herpesvirus; human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) model; lymphoma; lymphomagenesis

PMID:
27034392
DOI:
10.1093/ilar/ilv047
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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