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Vaccine. 2016 Jun 3;34(26):2953-2958. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.03.073. Epub 2016 Mar 29.

Status of research and development of vaccines for Streptococcus pyogenes.

Author information

1
Centre for International Child Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; Group A Streptococcal Research Group, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address: andrew.steer@rch.org.au.
2
Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
3
Medicine, University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN, USA.
4
Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology and Maurice Wilkins Centre, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
5
Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia.
6
Heart Institute, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
7
School of Biological Sciences and the Maurice Wilkins Centre, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
8
Pneumococcal Research Group, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
9
Philimmune LLC, Philadelphia, USA.
10
Centre for International Child Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; Group A Streptococcal Research Group, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia; Department of Paediatrics, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.

Abstract

Streptococcus pyogenes is an important global pathogen, causing considerable morbidity and mortality, especially in low and middle income countries where rheumatic heart disease and invasive infections are common. There is a number of promising vaccine candidates, most notably those based on the M protein, the key virulence factor for the bacterium. Vaccines against Streptococcus pyogenes are considered as impeded vaccines because of a number of crucial barriers to development. Considerable effort is needed by key players to bring current vaccine candidates through phase III clinical trials and there is a clear need to develop a roadmap for future development of current and new candidates.

KEYWORDS:

Group A Streptococcus; Rheumatic fever; Streptococcus pyogenes; Vaccine

PMID:
27032515
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.03.073
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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