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Br J Cancer. 2016 Apr 26;114(9):995-1002. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2016.85. Epub 2016 Mar 31.

Soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor type II and survival in colorectal cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
2
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
3
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
4
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
5
Division of MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
6
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
7
Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Chronic inflammation may play a role in colorectal cancer (CRC) pathogenesis. The relationship between soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor type II (sTNF-RII) and survival among CRC patients is not well defined.

METHODS:

We prospectively evaluated the association between pre-diagnosis plasma levels of sTNF-RII and mortality in 544 CRC patients from the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study diagnosed from 1990 to 2010. Primary and secondary end points were overall and CRC-specific mortality, respectively. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate multivariate hazard ratios for mortality.

RESULTS:

Higher sTNF-RII levels were significantly associated with increased overall mortality (multivariate HR=1.48, 95% CI 1.02-2.16, P-trend=0.006), but not with CRC-specific mortality (HR=1.23, 95% CI 0.72-2.08, P-trend=0.34). In subgroup analyses, among regular aspirin users, those with higher sTNF-RII levels had an adjusted HR of 0.52 (95% CI 0.20-1.33) for overall mortality compared with those with lower sTNF-RII levels, whereas among nonregular aspirin users the adjusted HR was 2.26 (95% CI 1.23-4.01, P for interaction=0.53).

CONCLUSIONS:

Among CRC patients, higher sTNF-RII levels are associated with a significant increase in overall mortality, but not CRC-specific mortality. The role of inflammation and anti-inflammatory medications in survival of CRC patients warrants further exploration.

PMID:
27031855
PMCID:
PMC4984918
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2016.85
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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