Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Fam Plann Perspect. 1989 Jan-Feb;21(1):12-8.

A direct mailing to teenage males about condom use: its impact on knowledge, attitudes and sexual behavior.

Author information

1
ETR Associates, Santa Cruz, Calif.

Erratum in

  • Fam Plann Perspect 1989 May-Jun;21(3):133.

Abstract

In August 1987, a letter, informational pamphlet and order coupon for free mail-order condoms were sent to an experimental group of teenage males 16-17 years of age. An experimental design was used to measure the impact of the mailing on teenagers' knowledge, attitudes and behavior. Approximately five weeks after the mailing, 985 members of this group and 1,033 members of the control group (who received no mailing) were interviewed by telephone. About seven months after the mailing, members of the experimental group who claimed they had ordered the free condoms were reinterviewed by phone. The results of the initial interviews revealed that about three-fourths of the teenagers in the experimental group had received the materials, and about two-thirds had read them. Moreover, males in the experimental group, particularly those who reported having received and read the pamphlet, were slightly but statistically significantly more knowledgeable about sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), pregnancy and contraceptives. On the other hand, there were no differences between males in the experimental and control groups in attitudes toward STDs or birth control, nor were there differences in actual sexual activity or in the use of birth control. However, the experimental group was significantly more likely to have ordered condoms by mail, presumably as a result of having received the free mail-order condom offer. Many of those who ordered condoms had previously had sex and had used condoms. However, a sizeable portion of those who ordered condoms did so prior to first intercourse, suggesting a possibly important early intervention.

PIP:

In August 1987, a letter, informational pamphlet and order coupon for free mail-order condoms were sent to an experimental group of teenage males ages 16-17. An experimental design was used to measure the impact of the mailing on teens' knowledge, attitudes, and behavior. Approximately 5 weeks after the mailing, 985 members of this group and 1033 members of the control group (who received no mailing) were interviewed by telephone. About 7 months after the mailing, members of the experimental group who claimed they had ordered the free condoms were reinterviewed by phone. The results of the initial interviews revealed that about 3/4 of the teens in the experimental group had received the materials, and about 2/3 had read them. Moreover, males in the experimental group, particularly those who reported having received and read the pamphlet, were slightly but statistically significantly more knowledgeable about sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), pregnancy, and contraceptives. On the other hand, there were no differences between males in the experimental and control groups in attitudes towards STDs or birth control, nor were there differences in actual sexual activity or in the use of birth control. However, the experimental group was significantly more likely to have ordered condoms by mail, presumably as a result of having received the free mail-order condom offer. Many of those who ordered condoms had previously had sex and had used condoms. However, a sizeable portion of those who ordered condoms did so prior to 1st intercourse, suggesting a possibly important early intervention.

PMID:
2703031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center