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Nat Rev Microbiol. 2016 Jun;14(6):337-45. doi: 10.1038/nrmicro.2016.25. Epub 2016 Mar 30.

Lipopolysaccharide transport and assembly at the outer membrane: the PEZ model.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.
2
Department of Bio-system Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.
3
Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA.
4
Department of Microbiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.
5
Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.
6
Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

Gram-negative bacteria have a double-membrane cellular envelope that enables them to colonize harsh environments and prevents the entry of many clinically available antibiotics. A main component of most outer membranes is lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a glycolipid containing several fatty acyl chains and up to hundreds of sugars that is synthesized in the cytoplasm. In the past two decades, the proteins that are responsible for transporting LPS across the cellular envelope and assembling it at the cell surface in Escherichia coli have been identified, but it remains unclear how they function. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in this area and present a model that explains how energy from the cytoplasm is used to power LPS transport across the cellular envelope to the cell surface.

PMID:
27026255
PMCID:
PMC4937791
DOI:
10.1038/nrmicro.2016.25
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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