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Econ Hum Biol. 2016 Sep;22:65-81. doi: 10.1016/j.ehb.2016.03.002. Epub 2016 Mar 11.

Early life height and weight production functions with endogenous energy and protein inputs.

Author information

1
Department of Economics, Universidad de Chile, Chile. Electronic address: epuentes@fen.uchile.cl.
2
Department of Economics, University of Houston, United States.
3
Departments of Economics and Sociology and Population Studies Center, University of Pennsylvania, United States.
4
Department of Economics, Rice University, United States.
5
Division of Nutritional Sciences and the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University and International Food Policy Research Institute, United States.
6
Department of Economics, Middlebury College, United States.
7
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, United States.
8
USC-Office of Population Studies Foundation, Inc and Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, University of San Carlos, Cebu, Philippines.
9
Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, United States.

Abstract

We examine effects of protein and energy intakes on height and weight growth for children between 6 and 24 months old in Guatemala and the Philippines. Using instrumental variables to control for endogeneity and estimating multiple specifications, we find that protein intake plays an important and positive role in height and weight growth in the 6-24 month period. Energy from other macronutrients, however, does not have a robust relation with these two anthropometric measures. Our estimates indicate that in contexts with substantial child undernutrition, increases in protein-rich food intake in the first 24 months can have important growth effects, which previous studies indicate are related significantly to a range of outcomes over the life cycle.

KEYWORDS:

Early childhood; Endogeneity of inputs; Growth; Nutrition; Proteins

PMID:
27026217
PMCID:
PMC5001437
DOI:
10.1016/j.ehb.2016.03.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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