Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Vaccine. 2016 May 5;34(21):2437-2443. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.03.065. Epub 2016 Mar 26.

SMS text message reminders to improve infant vaccination coverage in Guatemala: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, B065, 13123 E. 16th Ave., Aurora, CO 80045, USA; Center for Global Health, Colorado School of Public Health, Mail Stop A090, 13199 E Montview Blvd, Suite 310, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address: Gretchen.domek@childrenscolorado.org.
2
Center for Health Studies, Universidad del Valle de Guatemala, 18 Av. 11-95, Zona 15, Vista Hermosa III, Guatemala City, Guatemala. Electronic address: Icontreras@ces.uvg.edu.gt.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, B065, 13123 E. 16th Ave., Aurora, CO 80045, USA; Adult and Child Center for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science (ACCORDS), University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Mail Stop F443, 13199 E Montview Blvd, Suite 300, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address: Sean.o'leary@childrenscolorado.org.
4
Center for Global Health, Colorado School of Public Health, Mail Stop A090, 13199 E Montview Blvd, Suite 310, Aurora, CO 80045, USA; Department of Community and Behavioral Health, Colorado School of Public Health, 13001 E 17th Place, B119, Bldg 500, Rm E3345A, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address: Sheana.bull@ucdenver.edu.
5
Adult and Child Center for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science (ACCORDS), University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Mail Stop F443, 13199 E Montview Blvd, Suite 300, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address: Anna.furniss@ucdenver.edu.
6
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, B065, 13123 E. 16th Ave., Aurora, CO 80045, USA; Adult and Child Center for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science (ACCORDS), University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Mail Stop F443, 13199 E Montview Blvd, Suite 300, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address: Allison.kempe@childrenscolorado.org.
7
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, B065, 13123 E. 16th Ave., Aurora, CO 80045, USA; Center for Global Health, Colorado School of Public Health, Mail Stop A090, 13199 E Montview Blvd, Suite 310, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address: Edwin.asturias@childrenscolorado.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patient reminder systems are an evidence-based way to improve childhood vaccination rates but are difficult to implement in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Short Message Service (SMS) texts may offer a potential low-cost solution, especially in LMICs where mobile phones are becoming more ubiquitous.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if an SMS-based vaccination reminder system aimed at improving completion of the infant primary immunization series is feasible and acceptable in Guatemala.

METHODS:

A pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted at two public health clinics in Guatemala City. Infants aged 8-14 weeks presenting for the first dose of the primary immunization series were enrolled in March-April 2013. Participants randomized into the intervention received three SMS reminders one week before the second and third dose. A follow-up acceptability survey was administered to both groups.

RESULTS:

The participation rate was 86.8% (321/370); 8 did not own a cell phone and 12 could not use SMS. 96.9% of intervention parents were sent at least one SMS reminder prior to visit 2 and 96.3% prior to visit 3. Both intervention and usual care participants had high rates of vaccine and visit completion, with a non-statistically significant higher percentage of children in the intervention completing both visit 2 (95.0% vs. 90.1%, p=.12) and visit 3 (84.4% vs. 80.7%, p=.69). More intervention vs. usual care parents agreed that SMS reminders would be helpful for remembering appointments (p<.0001), agreed to being interested in receiving future SMS reminders (p<.0001), and said that they would be willing to pay for future SMS reminders (p=.01).

CONCLUSION:

This proof of concept evaluation showed that a new application of SMS technology is feasible to implement in a LMIC with high user satisfaction. Larger studies with modifications in the SMS system are needed to determine effectiveness (Clinical Trial Registry NCT01663636).

KEYWORDS:

Childhood; Immunization; Reminder-recall; SMS; Text messaging; mHealth

PMID:
27026145
PMCID:
PMC4859823
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.03.065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center