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Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2016 Jul;72(7):849-57. doi: 10.1007/s00228-016-2042-0. Epub 2016 Mar 29.

Medication use and drug-related problems among women at maternity wards-a cross-sectional study from two Norwegian hospitals.

Author information

1
Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety Research Group, Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, PO Box 1068, Blindern, 0316, Oslo, Norway.
2
Department of Obstetrics, Women and Children's Clinic, Ullevål, Oslo University Hospital, PO Box 4956, Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway.
3
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, PO Box 1171 Blindern, Oslo, 0318, Norway.
4
Maternity Ward Unit, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Drammen Hospital, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, PO Box 800, 3004, Drammen, Norway.
5
Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety Research Group, Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, PO Box 1068, Blindern, 0316, Oslo, Norway. h.m.e.nordeng@farmasi.uio.no.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

There is a lack of knowledge about drug-related problems (DRPs) among pregnant and lactating women. The aim of this study was to determine the extent and type of DRPs among pregnant and lactating women in the maternity ward at two Norwegian hospitals. We also aimed to investigate which drugs were involved in the identified DRPs, and the outcome of solving the DRPs.

METHODS:

Patient-reported treatment reviews were performed to assess the prevalence and type of DRPs among women at the two maternity wards.

RESULTS:

In all, 212 women were included in the study, of which 89 (42 %) had experienced at least one DRP (105 DRPs in total). "Need for additional drug" (49 cases, 46.7 %) was the most frequent. The most frequent drug group involved in DRPs was drugs acting on the respiratory system, and the most common intervention was raising awareness/providing confidence/giving information during the patient-reported treatment review.

CONCLUSIONS:

Over four out of ten women in the maternity wards have DRPs, and many have questions about drug use during pregnancy and lactation. Many of the DRPs could probably be avoided by providing patient-reported treatment reviews to pregnant women as a part of antenatal care. Multidisciplinary collaboration including physicians, midwifes, and pharmacists in antenatal care and in maternity ward could possibly prevent DRPs and thereby promote patient safety for pregnant and lactating women.

KEYWORDS:

Drug-related problems; Medication; Patient-reported treatment reviews; Pregnancy

PMID:
27023461
DOI:
10.1007/s00228-016-2042-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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