Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ann Hematol. 2016 May;95(6):985-91. doi: 10.1007/s00277-016-2645-7. Epub 2016 Mar 28.

Genotyping of 22 blood group antigen polymorphisms and establishing a national recipient registry in the Korean population.

Author information

1
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 82, Gumi-ro 173 beon-gil, Bundang, Seongnam, 13620, Gyeonggi, Korea.
2
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
3
Division of Human Blood Safety Surveillance, Korea Centers for Disease and Prevention, Cheongju, Korea.
4
Division of Medical Science Knowledge Management, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cheongju, Korea.
5
Blood Transfusion Research Institute, Korean Red Cross, Wonju, Korea.
6
Blood Service Headquarters, Korean Red Cross, Wonju, Korea.
7
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 82, Gumi-ro 173 beon-gil, Bundang, Seongnam, 13620, Gyeonggi, Korea. m91w95pf@snu.ac.kr.
8
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. m91w95pf@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

It is often difficult for standard blood banks in Korea to supply adequate amounts of blood for patients with rare phenotype. Moreover, the definition of a blood in need is ambiguous, and much remains to be learned. In this study, we determined the prevalence of various red blood cell (RBC) antigens from a donor viewpoint and estimated the demand for specific antigen-negative blood from a patient viewpoint. Our data will aid the establishment of a Rare Blood Program in Korea (KRBP). RBC genotyping of 419 blood donors was performed using a Lifecodes RBC/RBC-R typing kit (Immucor, Norcross, GA). A national recipient registry website has been established. Each hospital-based blood bank voluntarily enters data on antibodies detected and identified and the outcomes of specific antigen testing. We calculated the availabilities of specific antigen-negative blood components based on these registry data and predicted the prevalence of RBC antigens via RBC genotyping. The prevalences of various RBC antigens in the D-negative population were determined for the first time, and the Cartwright, Scianna, Dombrock, Colton, Landsteiner-Wiener, Cromer, and Knops blood group systems were identified. The availabilities of specific antigen-negative units differed when calculations were based on serotyping or genotyping, especially in the D-negative group. Data on the prevalences of various blood antigens are essential for estimating the availabilities of blood components that are appropriate for use by patients expressing relevant antibodies. Then, blood banks would be able to efficiently supply safe blood products.

KEYWORDS:

Luminex; RBC genotyping; RhD negatives

PMID:
27021300
DOI:
10.1007/s00277-016-2645-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center