Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2016 Mar 29;6:23559. doi: 10.1038/srep23559.

Identification of a new hominin bone from Denisova Cave, Siberia using collagen fingerprinting and mitochondrial DNA analysis.

Author information

1
RLAHA, University of Oxford, OX1 3QY, UK.
2
MPI-EVA, Leipzig, 04103, Germany.
3
Cranfield Forensic Institute, Cranfield University, SN6 8LA, UK.
4
Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, M13 9PL, UK.
5
Institute of Archeology and Ethnography, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia.

Abstract

DNA sequencing has revolutionised our understanding of archaic humans during the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic. Unfortunately, while many Palaeolithic sites contain large numbers of bones, the majority of these lack the diagnostic features necessary for traditional morphological identification. As a result the recovery of Pleistocene-age human remains is extremely rare. To circumvent this problem we have applied a method of collagen fingerprinting to more than 2000 fragmented bones from the site of Denisova Cave, Russia, in order to facilitate the discovery of human remains. As a result of our analysis a single hominin bone (Denisova 11) was identified, supported through in-depth peptide sequencing analysis, and found to carry mitochondrial DNA of the Neandertal type. Subsequent radiocarbon dating revealed the bone to be >50,000 years old. Here we demonstrate the huge potential collagen fingerprinting has for identifying hominin remains in highly fragmentary archaeological assemblages, improving the resources available for wider studies into human evolution.

PMID:
27020421
PMCID:
PMC4810434
DOI:
10.1038/srep23559
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center