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PLoS One. 2016 Mar 28;11(3):e0152564. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0152564. eCollection 2016.

Statin Use and the Risk of Parkinson's Disease: An Updated Meta-Analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, China.
2
Department of Ultrasound, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, China.
3
Department of Orthopedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, China.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

In response to the ongoing debate over the relationship between the use of statins and the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD), we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies to examine their association.

METHODS:

We conducted a review of the literature using electronic databases supplemented by a manual search to identify potentially relevant case-control or cohort studies. Summary relative risk (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. Sensitivity and subgroup analyses were also conducted.

RESULTS:

Eleven studies (five case-control and six cohort) with a total of 3,513,209 participants and 21,011 PD cases were included. Statin use was associated with a lower risk of PD, with a summary RR of 0.81 (95% CI 0.71-0.92). Sensitivity analysis demonstrated the robustness of results. Subgroup analyses showed that neither study design nor study region significantly influenced the effect estimates. However, subgroup studies adjusted for age or sex had a greater inverse association than did unadjusted analyses (age-adjusted RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.60-0.95; age-unadjusted RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.75-0.99 and sex-adjusted RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.59-0.98; sex-unadjusted RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.79-0.92).

CONCLUSIONS:

Results of this systematic review suggest that statin use is associated with a reduced PD risk. However, randomized controlled trials and more observational studies should be performed before strong conclusions are drawn.

PMID:
27019096
PMCID:
PMC4809483
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0152564
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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