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Plast Reconstr Surg. 2016 Apr;137(4):1263-72. doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000002017.

Surgical Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

Author information

1
New York, N.Y.; Washington, D.C.; Kansas City, Kan.; Los Angeles, Calif.; and Philadelphia, Pa. From the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Northwell Health, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System School of Medicine; the Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The George Washington University; the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center; the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Southern California; and the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Temple University.

Abstract

Surgical management of snoring and obstructive sleep apnea is indicated when a surgically correctable abnormality is believed to be the source of the problem. Many patients opt for surgical treatment after noninvasive forms of treatment have been proven ineffective or difficult to tolerate. With increasing frequency, functional rhinoplasty, septoplasty, turbinoplasty, palatal surgery, and orthognathic surgery are being used in the management of snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. Plastic surgeons' experience with aesthetic nasal surgery, nasal reconstruction, palatal surgery, and craniofacial surgery puts them at the forefront of performing surgery for snoring and sleep apnea. The role of functional septorhinoplasty, turbinoplasty, palatal surgery, genioglossal advancement, and orthognathic surgery is indispensable in the surgical management of obstructive sleep apnea. Multidisciplinary management of these patients is critical, and plastic surgeons are encouraged to work collaboratively with sleep medicine clinicians and centers.

PMID:
27018680
DOI:
10.1097/PRS.0000000000002017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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