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Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2016 Jun 1;310(11):H1388-401. doi: 10.1152/ajpheart.00665.2015. Epub 2016 Mar 25.

A technical review of optical mapping of intracellular calcium within myocardial tissue.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, The George Washington University. Washington, District of Columbia;
2
Université de Bordeaux, Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique de Bordeaux U1045, Bordeaux, France; Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique de Bordeaux U1045, Bordeaux, France; and L'Institut de Rythmologie et Modélisation Cardiaque LIRYC, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
3
Department of Biomedical Engineering, The George Washington University. Washington, District of Columbia; L'Institut de Rythmologie et Modélisation Cardiaque LIRYC, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
4
Department of Biomedical Engineering, The George Washington University. Washington, District of Columbia; phymwk@gwu.edu.

Abstract

Optical mapping of Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescence probes has become an extremely useful approach and adopted by many cardiovascular research laboratories to study a spectrum of myocardial physiology and disease conditions. Optical mapping data are often displayed as detailed pseudocolor images, providing unique insight for interpreting mechanisms of ectopic activity, action potential and Ca(2+) transient alternans, tachycardia, and fibrillation. Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent probes and optical mapping systems continue to evolve in the ongoing effort to improve therapies that ease the growing worldwide burden of cardiovascular disease. In this technical review we provide an updated overview of conventional approaches for optical mapping of Cai (2+) within intact myocardium. In doing so, a brief history of Cai (2+) probes is provided, and nonratiometric and ratiometric Ca(2+) probes are discussed, including probes for imaging sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and probes compatible with potentiometric dyes for dual optical mapping. Typical measurements derived from optical Cai (2+) signals are explained, and the analytics used to compute them are presented. Last, recent studies using Cai (2+) optical mapping to study arrhythmias, heart failure, and metabolic perturbations are summarized.

KEYWORDS:

calcium cycling; calcium fluorescence; calcium imaging; calcium mapping

PMID:
27016580
PMCID:
PMC4935510
DOI:
10.1152/ajpheart.00665.2015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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