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J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2016 Mar-Apr;39(3):185-91. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2016.02.002. Epub 2016 Mar 22.

Systematic Augmented Feedback and Dependency in Spinal Manipulation Learning: a Randomized Comparative Study.

Author information

1
Head of Chiropractic Knowledge and Skills Integration Domain, Intitut Franco-Européen de Chiropraxie, Ivry-sur-Seine, France.
2
Doctoral Student, Université Paris-Sud, Institut Franco-Européen de Chiropraxie, Ivry-sur-Seine, France.
3
Doctoral Student, Département d'anatomie, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, QC, Canada.
4
Full Professor, Département des sciences de l'activité physique, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, QC, Canada.
5
Full Professor, Département des sciences de l'activité physique, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, QC, Canada.. Electronic address: Martin.descarreaux@uqtr.ca.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of the study was to evaluate if systematic augmented feedback during short sessions of spinal manipulation (SM) training creates a dependency compared with short training session characterized by progressive withdrawal of augmented feedback.

METHODS:

Forty fourth- and fifth-year chiropractic students enrolled in a 5-year chiropractic program were randomized into 2 groups. The 2 groups performed the same number of SM with a 300-N peak force target on an instrumented device. Baseline assessment consisted of 10 trials without feedback. Three training blocks of 10 SMs were then performed with visual and verbal feedback. For the control group, feedback was always provided. For the experimental group, augmented feedback was provided for each trial of the first training block, 50% of the second block, and 20% of the last training block. A postintervention assessment of 10 trials without feedback was performed, and a retention assessment was conducted 20 minutes later.

RESULTS:

No group main effect was found on biomechanical parameters and error variables. A main effect of learning for the absolute error was observed, suggesting that short sessions of feedback training improve participants' accuracy.

CONCLUSION:

The results of the study suggest that feedback scheduling does not influence SM motor performance and learning in clinically experienced students.

KEYWORDS:

Chiropractic; Dependency; Education; Feedback; Learning; Manipulation; Physiological; Retention; Spinal

PMID:
27016338
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmpt.2016.02.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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