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J Appl Physiol (1985). 2016 Jun 1;120(11):1328-34. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.01023.2015. Epub 2016 Mar 24.

Sucrose ingestion after exhaustive exercise accelerates liver, but not muscle glycogen repletion compared with glucose ingestion in trained athletes.

Author information

1
NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Department of Sport, Exercise, and Rehabilitation, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom;
2
Department for Health, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom;
3
NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands;
4
Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom; and Newcastle Magnetic Resonance Centre, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
5
Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom; and.
6
Department of Sport, Exercise, and Rehabilitation, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom; Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom; and.
7
NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands; l.vanloon@maastrichtuniversity.nl.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of sucrose vs. glucose ingestion on postexercise liver and muscle glycogen repletion. Fifteen well-trained male cyclists completed two test days. Each test day started with glycogen-depleting exercise, followed by 5 h of recovery, during which subjects ingested 1.5 g·kg(-1)·h(-1) sucrose or glucose. Blood was sampled frequently and (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging were employed 0, 120, and 300 min postexercise to determine liver and muscle glycogen concentrations and liver volume. Results were as follows: Postexercise muscle glycogen concentrations increased significantly from 85 ± 27 (SD) vs. 86 ± 35 mmol/l to 140 ± 23 vs. 136 ± 26 mmol/l following sucrose and glucose ingestion, respectively (no differences between treatments: P = 0.673). Postexercise liver glycogen concentrations increased significantly from 183 ± 47 vs. 167 ± 65 mmol/l to 280 ± 72 vs. 234 ± 81 mmol/l following sucrose and glucose ingestion, respectively (time × treatment, P = 0.051). Liver volume increased significantly over the 300-min period after sucrose ingestion only (time × treatment, P = 0.001). As a result, total liver glycogen content increased during postexercise recovery to a greater extent in the sucrose treatment (from 53.6 ± 16.2 to 86.8 ± 29.0 g) compared with the glucose treatment (49.3 ± 25.5 to 65.7 ± 27.1 g; time × treatment, P < 0.001), equating to a 3.4 g/h (95% confidence interval: 1.6-5.1 g/h) greater repletion rate with sucrose vs. glucose ingestion. In conclusion, sucrose ingestion (1.5 g·kg(-1)·h(-1)) further accelerates postexercise liver, but not muscle glycogen repletion compared with glucose ingestion in trained athletes.

KEYWORDS:

13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy; carbohydrate; endurance exercise; fructose; recovery

PMID:
27013608
DOI:
10.1152/japplphysiol.01023.2015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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