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Maturitas. 2016 May;87:67-71. doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.02.015. Epub 2016 Feb 28.

Personal and professional use of menopausal hormone therapy among gynecologists: A multinational study (REDLINC VII).

Author information

1
Collaborative Group for Research of the Climacteric in Latin America (REDLINC), Santiago, Chile.
2
Collaborative Group for Research of the Climacteric in Latin America (REDLINC), Santiago, Chile; Departamento de Medicina Interna Sur, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
3
Collaborative Group for Research of the Climacteric in Latin America (REDLINC), Santiago, Chile; Institute of Biomedicine, Research Area for Women's Health, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Católica de Santiago de Guayaquil, Guayaquil, Ecuador. Electronic address: juan.blumel@redsalud.gov.cl.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previously, the REDLINC VI study showed that the main reason for the low use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) was its low rate of prescription by doctors.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the use of MHT and perceived related risks among gynecologists.

METHODS:

A self-administered and anonymous questionnaire was delivered to certified gynecologists in 11 Latin American countries.

RESULTS:

A total of 2154 gynecologists were contacted, of whom 85.3% responded to the survey (n = 1837). Mean age was 48.1 ± 11.4 years; 55.5% were male, 20.3% were faculty members and 85% had a partner. Overall, 85.4% of gynecologists responded that they would use MHT if they had menopausal symptoms (81.8% in the case of female gynecologists) or prescribe it to their partner (88.2% in the case of male gynecologists; p < 0.001). Perceived risk related to MHT use (on a scale from 0 to 10) was higher among female than among male gynecologists (4.06 ± 2.09 vs. 3.83 ± 2.11, p < 0.02). The top two perceived reported risks were thromboembolism (women 33.6% vs. men 41.4%, p < 0.009) and breast cancer (women 38.5% vs. men 33.9%, p < 0.03). Overall, gynecologists reported prescribing MHT to 48.9% of their symptomatic patients (women 47.3% vs. men 50.2%, p < 0.03) and 86.8% currently prescribed non-hormonal remedies and 83.8% alternative therapies for the management of the menopause. Gynecologists who were older and academic professionals prescribed MHT more often.

CONCLUSION:

Although this Latin American survey showed that gynecologists are mostly supporters of MHT use (for themselves or their partners), this is not necessarily reflected in their clinical practice.

KEYWORDS:

Gynecologists; Menopausal hormone therapy; Personal use; Prescribing behavior; Professionals

PMID:
27013290
DOI:
10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.02.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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