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Maturitas. 2016 May;87:40-8. doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.02.011. Epub 2016 Feb 18.

Gender, mental health, physical health and retirement: A prospective study of 21,608 Australians aged 55-69 years.

Author information

1
The Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia. Electronic address: Julie.Byles@newcastle.edu.au.
2
The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, Australia.
3
The Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia.
4
The National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; The Sax Institute, Sydney, Australia.
5
College of Arts and Social Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.
6
School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We examined retirement transitions by gender, and different associations between retirement, physical function and mental health.

METHODS:

Data for 21,608 participants aged 55-69 from the 45 and Up Study were used. Generalised estimating equations were used to investigate longitudinal associations between retirement with psychological distress (Kessler score, K10) and physical dysfunction across two time points, by gender separately.

RESULTS:

Retirement in men was associated with a 25% relative increase in mean physical dysfunction score (p<0.001) and a 2% relative increase in mean K10 score (p=0.004), although men with high physical dysfunction score had a 6% increase in mean K10 score (p=0.005) if retired. For women, retirement was associated with a 17% increase in mean physical dysfunction score (p<0.001), with no association observed with the K10 score. Results were adjusted for demographic and health covariates.

CONCLUSION:

Retirement is associated with physical dysfunction over time. Retirement is not associated with psychological distress among women, but retirement is associated with psychological distress among men who have a high level of physical dysfunction. The findings point to the importance of attending to the physical and mental health needs, around the retirement period, particularly for men with poor physical health.

KEYWORDS:

Gender; Longitudinal; Mental health; Physical health; Retirement

PMID:
27013287
DOI:
10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.02.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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