Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diagn Interv Imaging. 2016 May;97(5):505-12. doi: 10.1016/j.diii.2016.02.009. Epub 2016 Mar 21.

CT and MR imaging in congenital cardiac malformations: Where do we come from and where are we going?

Author information

1
Radiology, Rouen university hospital, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen, France; INSERM U1096, medicine and pharmacy UFR, 22, boulevard Gambetta, 76183 Rouen, France. Electronic address: jean-nicolas.dacher@chu-rouen.fr.
2
Pediatrics, Rouen university hospital, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen, France; Cardiology, Rouen university hospital, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen, France.
3
Pediatrics, Rouen university hospital, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen, France.
4
Radiology, Rouen university hospital, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen, France.
5
Radiology, Trousseau hospital, 26, avenue du Dr-Arnold-Netter, 75012 Paris, France.
6
INSERM U1096, medicine and pharmacy UFR, 22, boulevard Gambetta, 76183 Rouen, France; Cardiology, Rouen university hospital, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen, France.
7
Radiology, Rouen university hospital, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen, France; INSERM U1096, medicine and pharmacy UFR, 22, boulevard Gambetta, 76183 Rouen, France.

Abstract

The management of patients with congenital heart disease was profoundly changed firstly by the advent of pediatric and prenatal ultrasound and then more recently by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) of the heart and great vessels. The improved life expectancy of these patients has brought about new medical and imaging requirements. MRI and CT are increasing second line techniques in this group of patients. This article summarizes the advantages and limitations of CT and MRI in some frequently encountered situations in children and adults followed up for congenital heart disease.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiac CT; Cardiac MRI; Congenital malformation; Heart and great vessels

PMID:
27012158
DOI:
10.1016/j.diii.2016.02.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center