Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Wilderness Environ Med. 2016 Jun;27(2):294-301. doi: 10.1016/j.wem.2015.12.007. Epub 2016 Mar 21.

The "Heel Hook"-A Climbing-Specific Technique to Injure the Leg.

Author information

1
Department of Sports Orthopedics, Sports Medicine, Sports Traumatology, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Klinikum Bamberg, Bamberg, Germany (Drs Schöffl, Lutter, and Popp); Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, Friedrich Alexander University, Erlangen-Nuremberg, Nuremberg, Germany (Dr Schöffl); the CVPath Institute, Gaithersburg, MD (Dr Lutter).
2
Department of Sports Orthopedics, Sports Medicine, Sports Traumatology, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Klinikum Bamberg, Bamberg, Germany (Drs Schöffl, Lutter, and Popp). Electronic address: christoph.lutter@googlemail.com.
3
Department of Sports Orthopedics, Sports Medicine, Sports Traumatology, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Klinikum Bamberg, Bamberg, Germany (Drs Schöffl, Lutter, and Popp).

Abstract

Acute injuries in rock climbing either come from a fall onto the lower leg or from performing a hard move and injuring the upper extremity. Further evaluations of lower leg injuries in rock climbing athletes have been performed recently finding sport characteristics such as peroneal tendon dislocations or chronic deformations of the feet. One injury mechanism described in case reports is the so-called heel hook position, which is used more frequently today compared with the beginngs of rock climbing. In addition, the number of these injuries is expected to rise with the increase in popularity of climbing and bouldering. Therefore, it is important to further analyze this pathology. We investigated 17 patients with injuries of the lower extremities after performing a heel hook.

KEYWORDS:

bouldering; climbing; heel hook; hook; rock climbing; tendon tear

PMID:
27009908
DOI:
10.1016/j.wem.2015.12.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center