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PLoS One. 2016 Mar 23;11(3):e0151982. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0151982. eCollection 2016.

Diagnosing Depression in Chronic Pain Patients: DSM-IV Major Depressive Disorder vs. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI).

Author information

1
Pain Clinic, Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
2
Department of Clinical Science, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
3
Faculty of Medicine and Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Diagnosing depression in chronic pain is challenging due to overlapping somatic symptoms. In questionnaires, such as the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), responses may be influenced more by pain than by the severity of depression. In addition, previous studies have suggested that symptoms of negative self-image, a key element in depression, are uncommon in chronic pain-related depression. The object of this study is to assess the relationship of the somatic and cognitive-emotional items of BDI with the diagnosis of depression, pain intensity, and disability.

METHODS:

One hundred consecutive chronic pain patients completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (SCID) for the diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) according to DSM-IV. Two subscales of BDI (negative view of self and somatic-physical function) were created according to the factor model presented by Morley.

RESULTS:

In the regression analysis, the somatic-physical function factor associated with MDD, while the negative view of self factor did not. Patients with MDD had higher scores in several of the BDI items when analysed separately. Insomnia and weight loss were not dependent on the depression diagnosis.

LIMITATIONS:

The relatively small sample size and the selected patient sample limit the generalisability of the results.

CONCLUSIONS:

Somatic symptoms of depression are also common in chronic pain and should not be excluded when diagnosing depression in pain patients. Regardless of the assessment method, diagnosing depression in chronic pain remains a challenge and requires careful interpretation of symptoms.

PMID:
27008161
PMCID:
PMC4805196
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0151982
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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