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BMJ. 2016 Mar 22;352:i1209. doi: 10.1136/bmj.i1209.

Quality of diet and mortality among Japanese men and women: Japan Public Health Center based prospective study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Centre for Clinical Sciences, National Centre for Global Health and Medicine, 1-21-1 Toyama, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan, 162-8655 kkurotani@ri.ncgm.go.jp.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Centre for Clinical Sciences, National Centre for Global Health and Medicine, 1-21-1 Toyama, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan, 162-8655.
3
Department of Public Health, Tokyo Women's Medical University, 8-1 Kawadacho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan, 162-8666.
4
Department of Diabetes Research, National Centre for Global Health and Medicine, 1-21-1 Toyama, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan, 162-8655 Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Saitama Medical University, 38 Moro-hongo, Moroyama, Iruma-gun, Saitama, Japan, 350-0495.
5
Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Centre for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Centre, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan, 104-0045.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the association between adherence to the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top and total and cause specific mortality.

DESIGN:

Large scale population based prospective cohort study in Japan with follow-up for a median of 15 years.

SETTING:

11 public health centre areas across Japan.

PARTICIPANTS:

36,624 men and 42,970 women aged 45-75 who had no history of cancer, stroke, ischaemic heart disease, or chronic liver disease.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Deaths and causes of death identified with the residential registry and death certificates.

RESULTS:

Higher scores on the food guide (better adherence) were associated with lower total mortality; the multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of total mortality for the lowest through highest scores were 1.00, 0.92 (0.87 to 0.97), 0.88 (0.83 to 0.93), and 0.85 (0.79 to 0.91) (P<0.001 for trend) and the multivariable adjusted hazard ratio associated with a 10 point increase in food guide scores was 0.93 (0.91 to 0.95; P<0.001 for trend). This score was inversely associated with mortality from cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio associated with a 10 point increase 0.93, 0.89 to 0.98; P=0.005 for trend) and particularly from cerebrovascular disease (0.89, 0.82 to 0.95; P=0.002 for trend). There was some evidence, though not significant, of an inverse association for cancer mortality (0.96, 0.93 to 1.00; P=0.053 for trend).

CONCLUSION:

Closer adherence to Japanese dietary guidelines was associated with a lower risk of total mortality and mortality from cardiovascular disease, particularly from cerebrovascular disease, in Japanese adults.

PMID:
27005903
PMCID:
PMC4804125
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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