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Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 2016 Jul;32(4):181-90. doi: 10.1111/phpp.12241. Epub 2016 Apr 14.

Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are associated with vitiligo: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Bassett Medical Center and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Cooperstown, NY, USA.
2
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a number of autoimmune diseases. We completed a meta-analysis of observational studies to establish whether there was a relationship between hypovitaminosis D and the autoimmune skin disease vitiligo.

METHODS:

Comprehensive search was applied in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from their inception to December 2015. Inclusion criteria were observational studies that assessed 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in adults with vitiligo. The main outcome was the mean difference in serum 25(OH)D level between patients with vitiligo and controls.

RESULTS:

Our search strategy identified 383 articles; seventeen studies met the criteria for full-length review and seven studies, containing the data of 1200 patients, were included in a random-effects model meta-analysis. The pooled mean difference in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration between patients with vitiligo and controls was -7.45 ng/ml (95% confidence interval, -12.99 to -1.91, P-value = 0.01). The between-study heterogeneity (I(2) ) was 96%, P = value<0.001.

CONCLUSIONS:

This meta-analysis identifies a significant relationship between low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and vitiligo, but does not prove causation. Our findings emphasize the importance of measuring 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in patients with vitiligo. Further studies will be needed to establish whether vitamin D supplementation in this population improves the outcome of vitiligo.

KEYWORDS:

cholecalciferol; meta-analysis; pigmentation disorders; vitamin D; vitiligo

PMID:
27005676
DOI:
10.1111/phpp.12241
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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