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Dis Esophagus. 2017 Jan 1;30(1):1-5. doi: 10.1111/dote.12475.

Assessment of the incidence of squamous cell papilloma of the esophagus and the presence of high-risk human papilloma virus.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio,USA
2
Department of Pathology, MetroHealth Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio,USA
3
Department of Medicine, MetroHealth Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio,USA
4
Department of Biological Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio,USA
5
The Esophageal and Swallowing Center, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

There has been a recent increase in the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) associated with high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. We investigated the incidence of esophageal papilloma and the presence of high-risk HPV infection.

METHODS:

This is a cross-sectional study conducted at a County teaching hospital. Patients with esophageal papilloma between January 2000 and December 2013 were identified. Patients with sufficient specimens were tested for the HPV virus.

RESULTS:

Sixty patients with esophageal papilloma lesions were identified from 2000 to 2013. (31 males, age 51 ± 13 years). The incidence was 0.13% in 2000 and increased to 0.57% in 2013 (P < 0.0001). Twenty-nine patients (48.3%) had a papilloma that was more than 5 mm in size, and 20% had multiple lesions. The papilloma was located in the distal esophagus in 35 (58.3%) patients, mid esophagus in 17 (28.3%) patients, and proximal in 8 (13.3%) patients. Three (5%) patients had associated OPC, and 9 (47.4%) of the 19 patients tested were positive for high-risk HPV serotype 16.

CONCLUSIONS:

The incidence of esophageal papilloma has increased by fourfolds over the past 14 years. About half of the tested patients demonstrated high risk HPV. This may suggest a potential growing risk for esophageal squamous cell cancer in the future.

KEYWORDS:

esophageal papilloma; esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; human papilloma virus

PMID:
27001250
DOI:
10.1111/dote.12475
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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