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Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 May-Jun;58(6):639-50. doi: 10.1016/j.pcad.2016.03.002. Epub 2016 Mar 18.

Mobile Phone Interventions for the Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Community Health Systems, University of California, San Francisco. Electronic address: Linda.Park@ucsf.edu.
2
Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Medical Center, Cardiology Section, Seattle, WA; University of Washington, Department of Medicine. Electronic address: beattya@uw.edu.
3
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA. Electronic address: Zoey.Stafford@ucsf.edu.
4
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA; San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Department of Medicine. Electronic address: Mary.Whooley@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

Mobile health in the form of text messaging and mobile applications provides an innovative and effective approach to promote prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, the magnitude of these effects is unclear. Through a comprehensive search of databases from 2002-2016, we conducted a quantitative systematic review. The selected studies were critically evaluated to extract and summarize pertinent characteristics and outcomes. A large majority of studies (22 of 28, 79%) demonstrated text messaging, mobile applications, and telemonitoring via mobile phones were effective in improving outcomes. Some key factors associated with successful interventions included personalized messages with tailored advice, greater engagement (2-way text messaging, higher frequency of messages), and use of multiple modalities. Overall, text messaging appears more effective than smartphone-based interventions. Incorporating principles of behavioral activation will help promote and sustain healthy lifestyle behaviors in patients with CVD that result in improved clinical outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular disease; Mobile applications; Mobile health; Mobile phone; Systematic review; Text messaging

PMID:
27001245
PMCID:
PMC4904827
DOI:
10.1016/j.pcad.2016.03.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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