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Angew Chem Int Ed Engl. 2016 Jun 1;55(23):6600-26. doi: 10.1002/anie.201506818. Epub 2016 Mar 22.

Targeting Antibiotic Resistance.

Author information

1
Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Center for Organic and Medicinal Chemistry, Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW), Einsiedlerstrasse 31, 8820, Wädenswil, Switzerland.
2
Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Center for Organic and Medicinal Chemistry, Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW), Einsiedlerstrasse 31, 8820, Wädenswil, Switzerland. rainer.riedl@zhaw.ch.

Abstract

Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human-pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last-resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled "Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow" triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens.

KEYWORDS:

antibiotic resistance; antibiotics; drug design; medicinal chemistry; structure-activity relationships

PMID:
27000559
PMCID:
PMC5071768
DOI:
10.1002/anie.201506818
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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