Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychiatry Res Neuroimaging. 2016 Mar 30;249:27-37. doi: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2016.02.009. Epub 2016 Feb 24.

Microstructural changes to the brain of mice after methamphetamine exposure as identified with diffusion tensor imaging.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, M/C 0603, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
2
Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, M/C 0603, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Electronic address: gbrown@ucsd.edu.
3
Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, 200 West Arbor Drive, M/C 0834, La Jolla, CA 92103, USA.

Abstract

Methamphetamine (METH) is an addictive psychostimulant inducing neurotoxicity. Human magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of METH-dependent participants find various structural abnormities. Animal studies demonstrate immunohistochemical changes in multiple cellular pathways after METH exposure. Here, we characterized the long-term effects of METH on brain microstructure in mice exposed to an escalating METH binge regimen using in vivo DTI, a methodology directly translatable across species. Results revealed four patterns of differential fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) response when comparing METH-exposed (n=14) to saline-treated mice (n=13). Compared to the saline group, METH-exposed mice demonstrated: 1) decreased FA with no change in MD [corpus callosum (posterior forceps), internal capsule (left), thalamus (medial aspects), midbrain], 2) increased MD with no change in FA [posterior isocortical regions, caudate-putamen, hypothalamus, cerebral peduncle, internal capsule (right)], 3) increased FA with decreased MD [frontal isocortex, corpus callosum (genu)], and 4) increased FA with no change or increased MD [hippocampi, amygdala, lateral thalamus]. MD was negatively associated with calbindin-1 in hippocampi and positively with dopamine transporter in caudate-putamen. These findings highlight distributed and differential METH effects within the brain suggesting several distinct mechanisms. Such mechanisms likely change brain tissue differentially dependent upon neural location.

KEYWORDS:

Diffusion tensor imaging; Fractional anisotropy; Magnetic resonance imaging; Mean diffusivity; Methamphetamine; Mouse

PMID:
27000304
PMCID:
PMC4831583
DOI:
10.1016/j.pscychresns.2016.02.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center