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Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2016;10(5):565-9. doi: 10.1586/17474124.2016.1166953. Epub 2016 Apr 4.

Can attention to the intestinal microbiota improve understanding and treatment of anorexia nervosa?

Author information

1
a Department of Surgery , The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , NC , United States.
2
b Department of Nutrition , The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , NC , United States.
3
c Department of Psychiatry , The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , NC , United States.
4
d Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics , Karolinska Institutet , Stockholm , Sweden.
5
e Kenyon College , Gambier , OH , United States.
6
f Department of Medicine , Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , NC , United States.

Abstract

Anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by severe dietary restriction or other weight loss behaviors and exhibits the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. Therapeutic renourishment in AN is founded primarily on clinical opinion and guidelines, with a weak evidence base. Genetic factors do not fully account for the etiology of AN, and non-genetic factors that contribute to the onset and persistence of this disease warrant investigation. Compelling evidence that the intestinal microbiota regulates adiposity and metabolism, and more recently, anxiety behavior, provides a strong rationale for exploring the role of this complex microbial community in the onset, maintenance of, and recovery from AN. This review explores the relationship between the intestinal microbiota and AN and a potential role for this enteric microbial community as a therapy for this severe illness.

KEYWORDS:

Anorexia nervosa; adiposity; behavior; intestinal microbiota; metabolism; refeeding

PMID:
27003627
PMCID:
PMC4861228
DOI:
10.1586/17474124.2016.1166953
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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