Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Evid Based Med. 2016 Aug;9(3):152-162. doi: 10.1111/jebm.12197.

Using AGREE II to evaluate the quality of traditional medicine clinical practice guidelines in China.

Deng W1, Li L2, Wang Z3, Chang X2, Li R1, Fang Z2, Wei D4,5, Yao L4,5, Wang X4,5, Wang Q4,5, An G6,7, Chen Y8.

Author information

1
The Second Clinical Medical College of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000, China.
2
The First Clinical Medical College of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000, China.
3
School of Public Health, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000, China.
4
Evidence-Based Medicine Center/Chinese GRADE Center/School of Basic Medical Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu, 730000, China.
5
Key Laboratory of Evidence Based Medicine and Knowledge Translation of Gansu Province, Lanzhou, 730000, China.
6
Acupuncture and Tuina College, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, 201203, China.
7
Yueyang Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Shanghai University of TCM, Shanghai, 201203, China.
8
Dongzhimen Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100700, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate/assess the quality of the clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) of traditional medicine in China.

METHODS:

We systematically searched the literature databases WanFang Data, VIP, CNKI, and CBM for studies published between 1978 and 2012 to identify and select CPGs of traditional medicine. We used the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) instrument to evaluate these guidelines.

RESULTS:

A total of 75 guidelines were included, of which 46 guidelines (62%) were on Traditional Chinese Medicine, 19 (25%) on Chinese Integrated Medicine, and 10 (13%) on Uyghur Medicine. Most traditional medicine CPGs published in domestic journals scored <20% (range: 0% to 63%). Eleven (14%) CPGs were developed following the methodology of evidence-based medicine. In each domain of AGREE II, traditional medicine CPGs performed clearly better than international CPGs. The same trend was seen in guidelines of modern medicine.

CONCLUSIONS:

An increasing amount of CPGs are being published, but their quality is low. Referring to the key points of international guidelines development, supervision through AGREE II, cooperating with international groups and exploring the strategy of guideline development could improve the quality of CPGs on traditional medicine.

KEYWORDS:

AGREE II; Traditional Chinese Medicine; clinical practice guidelines; quality assessment; traditional Medicine

PMID:
26997003
DOI:
10.1111/jebm.12197

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center