Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Acta Neurol Scand. 2017 Jan;135(1):100-107. doi: 10.1111/ane.12587. Epub 2016 Mar 15.

Long-term treatment with methylphenidate for fatigue after traumatic brain injury.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
2
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine/Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
3
Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Kungälv Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) may cause long-lasting post-concussive symptoms, such as mental fatigue and concentration difficulties, and this may become the main hindrance for returning to work and studies. There is currently no effective treatment for long-lasting mental fatigue. In this hypothesis generating study, the long-term effects of methylphenidate on mental fatigue, cognitive function, and safety were assessed.

MATERIALS & METHODS:

Thirty participants who suffered from long-term post-concussion symptoms after a mild TBI or moderate TBI and who had reported positive effects with methylphenidate during an initial phase of this follow-up study were treated with methylphenidate for a further six months.

RESULTS:

After six-month follow-up, effects on Mental Fatigue Scale (MFS), depression, anxiety, and cognitive function (processing speed, attention, working memory) were significantly improved compared to baseline data (P < 0.001, respectively). Heart rate was significantly increased (P = 0.01), while blood pressure was not changed.

CONCLUSIONS:

Individuals suffering from prolonged symptoms after TBI reported reduced mental fatigue and improved cognitive functions with long-term methylphenidate treatment. It is suggested that methylphenidate can be a treatment option for long-term mental fatigue and cognitive impairment after a TBI, but further randomized control research is warranted.

KEYWORDS:

cognition; mental fatigue; methylphenidate; traumatic brain injury

PMID:
26991608
DOI:
10.1111/ane.12587
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center