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Auton Neurosci. 2016 May;197:41-5. doi: 10.1016/j.autneu.2016.03.002. Epub 2016 Mar 4.

Acute effect of oral sensation of sweetness on celiac artery blood flow and gastric myoelectrical activity in humans.

Author information

1
Graduate School of Comprehensive Scientific Research, Prefectural University of Hiroshima, 1-1-71 Ujina-higashi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8558, Japan.
2
School of Health Sciences, Prefectural University of Hiroshima, 1-1-71 Ujina-higashi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8558, Japan.
3
Graduate School of Comprehensive Scientific Research, Prefectural University of Hiroshima, 1-1-71 Ujina-higashi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8558, Japan; School of Health Sciences, Prefectural University of Hiroshima, 1-1-71 Ujina-higashi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8558, Japan.
4
Institute of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527, Japan.
5
Graduate School of Comprehensive Scientific Research, Prefectural University of Hiroshima, 1-1-71 Ujina-higashi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8558, Japan; School of Health Sciences, Prefectural University of Hiroshima, 1-1-71 Ujina-higashi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8558, Japan. Electronic address: fukuba@pu-hiroshima.ac.jp.

Abstract

Little is known about the effect of sweet taste stimulus on gastrointestinal motility and splanchnic blood flow. We examined whether gastric myoelectrical activity and/or celiac artery blood flow (CABF), which perfuses the stomach, are increased following an oral sensation of sweetness. After overnight fasting, 11 subjects rested for 5min and sipped, but not swallowed, one of four solutions for 1min. The fluid was then spat out, and subjects remained at rest for a further 10min. Fluids were approximately 15ml of three glucose solutions (4, 16, or 48%) or distilled water. Subjects completed trials with all four solutions in a randomized order. During each trial, gastric myoelectrical activity and CABF were continuously measured using electrogastrography and pulsed Doppler ultrasonography, respectively. None of the four solutions affected gastric myoelectrical activity. CABF was significantly increased after oral stimuli by all three glucose solutions, but not by water. There were no significant differences in the increments in CABF among the three glucose solutions. These results suggest that a sweet taste stimulus above a certain level of intensity acutely increases CABF during cephalic phase, without augmentation of gastric myoelectrical activity.

KEYWORDS:

Cephalic phase; Doppler ultrasonography; Electrogastrography; Gastric motility; SWEET taste; splanchnic circulation

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