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PLoS One. 2016 Mar 17;11(3):e0150848. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0150848. eCollection 2016.

Muscle Damage following Maximal Eccentric Knee Extensions in Males and Females.

Author information

1
Department of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation, Northumbria University, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, United Kingdom.
2
Institute for Performance Research, Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University Cheshire, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Abstract

AIM:

To investigate whether there is a sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage.

MATERIALS AND METHOD:

Vastus Lateralis and patella tendon properties were measured in males and females using ultrasonography. During maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions (12 reps x 6 sets), Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions torque were recorded every 10° of knee joint angle (20-90°). Isometric torque, Creatine Kinase and muscle soreness were measured pre, post, 48, 96 and 168 hours post damage as markers of exercise induced muscle damage.

RESULTS:

Patella tendon stiffness and Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening were significantly higher in males compared to females (p<0.05). There was no sex difference in isometric torque loss and muscle soreness post exercise induced muscle damage (p>0.05). Creatine Kinase levels post exercise induced muscle damage were higher in males compared to females (p<0.05), and remained higher when maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, relative to estimated quadriceps anatomical cross sectional area, was taken as a covariate (p<0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Based on isometric torque loss, there is no sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. The higher Creatine Kinase in males could not be explained by differences in maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and patella tendon stiffness. Further research is required to understand the significant sex differences in Creatine Kinase levels following exercise induced muscle damage.

PMID:
26986066
PMCID:
PMC4795791
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0150848
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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