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Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2016 Jun;67(4):461-9. doi: 10.3109/09637486.2016.1161011. Epub 2016 Mar 17.

Flaxseed supplementation in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a pilot randomized, open labeled, controlled study.

Author information

1
a Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Technology , National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science , Tehran , Iran ;
2
b Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Nutrition and Dietetics , Tehran University of Medical Sciences , Tehran , Iran ;
3
c Digestive Disease Research Institute, ImamKhomeini Hospital , Tehran University of Medical Sciences , Tehran , Iran ;
4
d Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute , Tehran University of Medical Sciences , Tehran , Iran.

Abstract

A two-arm randomized open labeled controlled clinical trial was conducted on 50 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Participants were assigned to take either a lifestyle modification (LM), or LM +30 g/day brown milled flaxseed for 12 weeks. At the end of the study, body weight, liver enzymes, insulin resistance and hepatic fibrosis and steatosis decreased significantly in both groups (p< 0.05); however, this reduction was significantly greater in those who took flaxseed supplementation (p < 0.05). The significant mean differences were reached in hepatic markers between flaxseed and control group, respectively: ALT [-11.12 compared with -3.7 U/L; P< 0.001], AST [-8.29 compared with -4 U/L; p < 0.001], GGT [-15.7 compared with -2.62 U/L; p < 0.001], fibrosis score [-1.26 compared with -0.77 kPa; p = 0.013] and steatosis score [-47 compared with -15.45 dB/m; p = 0.022]. In conclusion, flaxseed supplementation plus lifestyle modification is more effective than lifestyle modification alone for NAFLD management.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical trial; flaxseed; hepatic fibrosis; liver enzymes; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

PMID:
26983396
DOI:
10.3109/09637486.2016.1161011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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