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Immunity. 2016 Mar 15;44(3):520-522. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2016.02.027.

Silence of the ROS.

Author information

1
Genetics and Genomic Sciences Department, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.
2
Genetics and Genomic Sciences Department, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA; Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA. Electronic address: brian.brown@mssm.edu.

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during T cell activation and serve a signaling function but can also be damaging. In this issue of Immunity, Zhang et al. (2016) show that miR-23a prevents ROS-elicited necrosis by suppressing cyclophilin D (PPIF), a regulator of ROS escape from mitochondria.

PMID:
26982360
DOI:
10.1016/j.immuni.2016.02.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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