Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Invest Surg. 2016 Oct;29(5):266-74. doi: 10.3109/08941939.2016.1149640. Epub 2016 Mar 16.

Fetuin A is a Predictor of Liver Fat in Preoperative Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

Author information

1
a Department of Clinical Nutrition , German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke , Nuthetal , Germany ;
2
b Integrated Research and Treatment Center, Center for Sepsis Control and Care (CSCC) , Friedrich Schiller University , Jena , Germany.
3
c Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care , Jena University Hospital , Jena , Germany ;
4
d Section of Metabolic and Vascular Medicine, Medical Clinic III , University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus , Dresden , Germany ;
5
e Institute of Nutrition , Friedrich Schiller University , Jena , Germany.
6
f Institute for Molecular Cell Biology , Germany Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Jena University Hospital , Jena , Germany ;
7
g Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery , Charité-Universitätsmedizin , Berlin , Germany ;
8
h Department of General-, Visceral-, Vascular- and Paediatric Surgery , University Hospital of Wuerzburg , Wuerzburg , Germany ;
9
i Institute of Pathology , Charité-Universitätsmedizin , Berlin , Germany ;
10
j Warwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism , University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire , CV2 2DX , Coventry , UK , Division of Metabolic & Vascular Health , University of Warwick , CV4 7AL , Coventry , UK ;
11
k Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery , Friedrich Schiller University of Jena , Jena , Germany ;
12
l Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutrition , Charité-Universitätsmedizin , Berlin , Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and steatohepatitis (NASH) are frequent comorbidities in perioperative patients. However, the predictive role of the hepatokine fetuin A was not evaluated in this collective.

OBJECTIVE:

To study fetuin A as predictor of NAFLD/NASH in preoperative patients.

METHODS:

58 subjects were included. Fetuin A was studied in patients undergoing open abdominal surgery and in a subset with acute liver failure. Blood and liver specimens were sampled. NAFLD was histologically evaluated. Liver fat was additionally analyzed by an enzymatic approach, circulating fetuin A by enzyme linked-immunosorbent assay, fetuin A mRNA by reverse-transcription PCR.

RESULTS:

Univariate correlation studies linked fetuin A to liver steatosis (r = 0.40, p = .029) and hepatocellular ballooning degeneration (r = 0.34, p = .026). Compared to non-NAFLD subjects fetuin A was increased in NAFLD (p = .009) and in NASH (p = .029). However, when corrected for main confounders by linear modeling, fetuin A remained related to hepatic steatosis, but not to ballooning degeneration or other NAFLD features. In support of this, biochemically analyzed liver lipids correlated with fetuin A in plasma (r = 0.34, p = .033) and with hepatic fetuin A mRNA (r = 0.54, p < .001). In addition, plasma fetuin A was related to hepatic mRNA (r = 0.32, p = .036), while circulating levels were reduced by 64% with acute liver failure (p < .001), confirming the liver as main fetuin A source.

CONCLUSION:

Fetuin A is suggested as noninvasive biomarker of hepatic steatosis in preoperative settings.

KEYWORDS:

Fetuin A; NAFLD; NAFLD screening; hepatokine; insulin resistance; liver failure

PMID:
26980291
DOI:
10.3109/08941939.2016.1149640
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center