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J Immunol. 2016 May 1;196(9):3828-33. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1500532. Epub 2016 Mar 14.

Gαi2 and Gαi3 Differentially Regulate Arrest from Flow and Chemotaxis in Mouse Neutrophils.

Author information

1
Division of Inflammation Biology, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA 92037;
2
Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093; and.
3
Division of Inflammation Biology, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA 92037; Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 Klaus@lji.org.

Abstract

Leukocyte recruitment to inflammation sites progresses in a multistep cascade. Chemokines regulate multiple steps of the cascade, including arrest, transmigration, and chemotaxis. The most important chemokine receptor in mouse neutrophils is CXCR2, which couples through Gαi2- and Gαi3-containing heterotrimeric G proteins. Neutrophils arrest in response to CXCR2 stimulation. This is defective in Gαi2-deficient neutrophils. In this study, we show that Gαi3-deficient neutrophils showed reduced transmigration but normal arrest in mice. We also tested Gαi2- or Gαi3-deficient neutrophils in a CXCL1 gradient generated by a microfluidic device. Gαi3-, but not Gαi2-, deficient neutrophils showed significantly reduced migration and directionality. This was confirmed in a model of sterile inflammation in vivo. Gαi2-, but not Gαi3-, deficient neutrophils showed decreased Ca(2+) flux in response to CXCR2 stimulation. Conversely, Gαi3-, but not Gαi2-, deficient neutrophils exhibited reduced AKT phosphorylation upon CXCR2 stimulation. We conclude that Gαi2 controls arrest and Gαi3 controls transmigration and chemotaxis in response to chemokine stimulation of neutrophils.

PMID:
26976957
PMCID:
PMC4868657
DOI:
10.4049/jimmunol.1500532
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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