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J Immigr Minor Health. 2017 Jun;19(3):723-732. doi: 10.1007/s10903-016-0363-9.

Seeking Asylum: Challenges Faced by the LGB Community.

Author information

1
Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. piwo@bu.edu.
2
Boston Center for Refugee Health and Human Rights, Boston Medical Center, Dowling 7, 771 Albany St., Boston, MA, 02118, USA. piwo@bu.edu.
3
Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Boston Center for Refugee Health and Human Rights, Boston Medical Center, Dowling 7, 771 Albany St., Boston, MA, 02118, USA.
5
Political Asylum/Immigration Representation Project, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

A retrospective chart review was completed of patients self-identified as lesbian, gay, or bisexual seen through a program for survivors of torture between June 9, 2009 and December 31, 2014 (n = 50). Almost all (98 %) experienced persecution due to their sexual orientation and 84 % were survivors of torture. The circumstances under which the disclosure of sexual orientation took place in the country of origin were often traumatic. In several, efforts were made to change their sexual orientation often through forced marriage. Those in same sex relationships had relationships often marred by tragedy. Women were more likely to be forced to move from place to place, experience rape/sexual assault and threats whereas men were more likely to be persecuted by people on the street. All presented with symptoms of depression and anxiety. Providers need to be attuned to the potential traumatic histories of those fleeing persecution due to sexual orientation, and the medical, social, psychological, and legal implications.

KEYWORDS:

Asylum seeker; LGB; Sexual orientation; Torture

PMID:
26976005
DOI:
10.1007/s10903-016-0363-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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