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Neurobiol Aging. 2016 Apr;40:61-67. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2015.12.013. Epub 2015 Dec 28.

Maternal dementia age at onset in relation to amyloid burden in non-demented elderly offspring.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
2
Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
8
Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: kajohnson@pet.mgh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Family history (FH) of dementia is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, particularly when the FH is maternal and when the age of dementia onset (AO) is younger. This study tested whether brain amyloid-beta deposition, measured in vivo with (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B (PiB), was associated with parental dementia and/or younger parental AO. Detailed FH and positron emission tomography (PiB) data were acquired in 147 nondemented aging individuals (mean age 75 ± 8). No participant had both positive maternal and paternal FH. A series of analyses revealed that those with maternal, but not paternal, FH had greater levels of PiB retention in a global cortical region than those without FH. PiB retention in maternal FH was not significantly greater than paternal FH. Younger maternal dementia AO was related to greater PiB retention in offspring, whereas younger paternal dementia AO was not. Overall, results suggest that not only is amyloid-beta burden greater in individuals with maternal FH, but also that the burden is greater in association with younger maternal AO.

KEYWORDS:

Amyloid-beta; Family history; PET; PiB

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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