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Cell. 2016 Mar 24;165(1):153-164. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.02.035. Epub 2016 Mar 10.

The CASTOR Proteins Are Arginine Sensors for the mTORC1 Pathway.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA; Department of Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 415 Main Street, Cambridge MA 02142, USA.
2
Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
3
Department of Biology, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA; Department of Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 415 Main Street, Cambridge MA 02142, USA. Electronic address: sabatini@wi.mit.edu.

Abstract

Amino acids signal to the mTOR complex I (mTORC1) growth pathway through the Rag GTPases. Multiple distinct complexes regulate the Rags, including GATOR1, a GTPase activating protein (GAP), and GATOR2, a positive regulator of unknown molecular function. Arginine stimulation of cells activates mTORC1, but how it is sensed is not well understood. Recently, SLC38A9 was identified as a putative lysosomal arginine sensor required for arginine to activate mTORC1 but how arginine deprivation represses mTORC1 is unknown. Here, we show that CASTOR1, a previously uncharacterized protein, interacts with GATOR2 and is required for arginine deprivation to inhibit mTORC1. CASTOR1 homodimerizes and can also heterodimerize with the related protein, CASTOR2. Arginine disrupts the CASTOR1-GATOR2 complex by binding to CASTOR1 with a dissociation constant of ~30 μM, and its arginine-binding capacity is required for arginine to activate mTORC1 in cells. Collectively, these results establish CASTOR1 as an arginine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway.

PMID:
26972053
PMCID:
PMC4808398
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2016.02.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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