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Neuron. 2016 Apr 6;90(1):101-12. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2016.02.019. Epub 2016 Mar 10.

Distinct Contribution of Adult-Born Hippocampal Granule Cells to Context Encoding.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Doctoral Program in Neurobiology and Behavior, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
2
Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Division of Integrative Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032, USA.
4
Division of Integrative Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Division of Integrative Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032, USA; Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, UCL, London WC1E 0BT, UK.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Division of Integrative Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Kavli Institute for Brain Science, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
7
Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Kavli Institute for Brain Science, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: al2856@cumc.columbia.edu.
8
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Division of Integrative Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA; Center for Integrative Neuroscience, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.

Abstract

Adult-born granule cells (abGCs) have been implicated in cognition and mood; however, it remains unknown how these cells behave in vivo. Here, we have used two-photon calcium imaging to monitor the activity of young abGCs in awake behaving mice. We find that young adult-born neurons fire at a higher rate in vivo but paradoxically exhibit less spatial tuning than their mature counterparts. When presented with different contexts, mature granule cells underwent robust remapping of their spatial representations, and the few spatially tuned adult-born cells remapped to a similar degree. We next used optogenetic silencing to confirm the direct involvement of abGCs in context encoding and discrimination, consistent with their proposed role in pattern separation. These results provide the first in vivo characterization of abGCs and reveal their participation in the encoding of novel information.

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PMID:
26971949
PMCID:
PMC4962695
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2016.02.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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