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Semin Oncol. 2016 Feb;43(1):154-160. doi: 10.1053/j.seminoncol.2015.09.012. Epub 2015 Sep 8.

Targeting obesity-related adipose tissue dysfunction to prevent cancer development and progression.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: gucalpa@mskcc.org.
2
Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

The incidence of obesity, a leading modifiable risk factor for common solid tumors, is increasing. Effective interventions are needed to minimize the public health implications of obesity. Although the mechanisms linking increased adiposity to malignancy are incompletely understood, growing evidence points to complex interactions among multiple systemic and tissue-specific pathways including inflamed white adipose tissue. The metabolic and inflammatory consequences of white adipose tissue dysfunction collectively provide a plausible explanation for the link between overweight/obesity and carcinogenesis. Gaining a better understanding of these underlying molecular pathways and developing risk assessment tools that identify at-risk populations will be critical in implementing effective and novel cancer prevention and management strategies.

KEYWORDS:

Adipose tissue; Body mass index; Cancer prevention; Inflammation; Metabolic syndrome; Obesity

PMID:
26970134
PMCID:
PMC4789163
DOI:
10.1053/j.seminoncol.2015.09.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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