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Int J Dev Neurosci. 2016 Dec;55:140-149. doi: 10.1016/j.ijdevneu.2016.03.004. Epub 2016 Mar 9.

Intra-axonal protein synthesis in development and beyond.

Author information

1
Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal; ICVS/3B's, PT Associate Laboratory, Braga/Guimar√£es, Portugal; The Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, and Department for Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
2
The Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, and Department for Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: uh2112@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

Proteins can be locally produced in the periphery of a cell, allowing a rapid and spatially precise response to the changes in its environment. This process is especially relevant in highly polarized and morphologically complex cells such as neurons. The study of local translation in axons has evolved from being primarily focused on developing axons, to the notion that also mature axons can produce proteins. Axonal translation has been implied in several physiological and pathological conditions, and in all cases it shares common molecular actors and pathways as well as regulatory mechanisms. Here, we review the main findings in these fields, and attempt to highlight shared principles.

KEYWORDS:

Axon growth/branching; Axonal translation; Nerve injury; Neurodegeneration; Synapse formation; mRNA

PMID:
26970010
PMCID:
PMC5017888
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijdevneu.2016.03.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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