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Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2016 Jun;45(6):764-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ijom.2016.02.007. Epub 2016 Mar 8.

Association of serum electrolytes and smoking with salivary gland stone formation.

Author information

1
Calcium Signaling Laboratory, Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.
2
Calcium Signaling Laboratory, Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA; ENT Head and Neck Section, Surgical Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.
3
Biostatistics Core, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.
4
ENT Head and Neck Section, Surgical Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.
5
Calcium Signaling Laboratory, Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA. Electronic address: bidhan.bandyopadhyay@va.gov.

Abstract

To further define potential factors that may contribute to stone formation in salivary glands (sialolithiasis), a retrospective chart review was performed of patients diagnosed with sialolithiasis between March 1, 1998 and February 29, 2012. Information on salivary gland stone number, location and size, medical history, medications, and serum electrolyte levels were collected. Associations between electrolyte levels and stone characteristics (such as stone number and size) were examined. Fifty-nine patients were identified; their median age was 58 years (range 25-89 years) and most were male (95%). Salivary stones were most commonly located in the submandibular glands (83%). Thirty-five patients (59%) had a smoking history, with 16 (27%) reported as current smokers. There was a significant association between current smoker status and stone size (mean largest stone size 12.4±8.8mm vs. 7.5±4.8mm in current smokers vs. non-smokers; P=0.03). Serum sodium levels (r=0.32, P=0.014) and serum potassium levels (r=0.31, P=0.017) showed significant positive correlations with stone size. While the aetiology of sialolithiasis remains unclear, smoking (which can contribute to reduced saliva flow) and higher serum sodium levels (which can reflect volume depletion) are associated with larger salivary stones.

KEYWORDS:

diuretics; patient factor; serum electrolyte levels; sialolithiasis; smoking

PMID:
26969301
PMCID:
PMC4862889
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijom.2016.02.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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