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J Am Soc Nephrol. 2016 Sep;27(9):2842-50. doi: 10.1681/ASN.2015070763. Epub 2016 Mar 10.

Race, APOL1 Risk, and eGFR Decline in the General Population.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; and Department of Epidemiology and mgrams2@jhmi.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology and.
3
Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; and.
4
Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; and Department of Epidemiology and.
5
Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; and Department of Epidemiology and Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

Abstract

The APOL1 high-risk genotype, present in approximately 13% of blacks in the United States, is a risk factor for kidney function decline in populations with CKD. It is unknown whether genetic screening is indicated in the general population. We evaluated the prognosis of APOL1 high-risk status in participants in the population-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, including associations with eGFR decline, variability in eGFR decline, and related adverse health events (AKI, ESRD, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, pre-ESRD and total hospitalization rate, and mortality). Among 15,140 ARIC participants followed from 1987-1989 (baseline) to 2011-2013, 75.3% were white, 21.5% were black/APOL1 low-risk, and 3.2% were black/APOL1 high-risk. In a demographic-adjusted analysis, blacks had a higher risk for all assessed adverse health events; however, in analyses adjusted for comorbid conditions and socioeconomic status, blacks had a higher risk for hypertension, diabetes, and ESRD only. Among blacks, the APOL1 high-risk genotype associated only with higher risk of ESRD in a fully adjusted analysis. Black race and APOL1 high-risk status were associated with faster eGFR decline (P<0.001 for each). However, we detected substantial overlap among the groups: median (10th-90th percentile) unadjusted eGFR decline was 1.5 (1.0-2.2) ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year for whites, 2.1 (1.4-3.1) ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year for blacks with APOL1 low-risk status, and 2.3 (1.5-3.5) ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year for blacks with APOL1 high-risk status. The high variability in eGFR decline among blacks with and without the APOL1 high-risk genotype suggests that population-based screening is not yet justified.

KEYWORDS:

end-stage renal disease; ethnicity; glomerular filtration rate

PMID:
26966015
PMCID:
PMC5004654
DOI:
10.1681/ASN.2015070763
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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