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J Struct Biol. 2016 Jun;194(3):292-302. doi: 10.1016/j.jsb.2016.03.005. Epub 2016 Mar 7.

Structural analysis of Gossypium hirsutum fibers grown under greenhouse and hydroponic conditions.

Author information

1
Institut für Chemie - Anorganische Chemie, Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät II-Chemie, Physik und Mathematik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Kurt-Mothes-Straße 2, Halle 06120, Germany. Electronic address: filipe.natalio@chemie.uni-halle.de.
2
Institut für Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Duesbergweg 10-14, 55128 Mainz, Germany.
3
Institut für Chemie - Anorganische Chemie, Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät II-Chemie, Physik und Mathematik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Kurt-Mothes-Straße 2, Halle 06120, Germany.
4
Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Biozentrum, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle, Germany.
5
Institut für Physik, Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, A-8700 Leoben, Austria.
6
Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Biozentrum, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle, Germany; Institut für Chemie - Organische Chemie, Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät II-Chemie, Physik und Mathematik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Kurt-Mothes-Straße 2, Halle 06120, Germany.

Abstract

Cotton is the one of the world's most important crops. Like any other crop, cotton growth/development and fiber quality is highly dependent on environmental factors. Increasing global weather instability has been negatively impacting its economy. Cotton is a crop that exerts an intensive pressure over natural resources (land and water) and demands an overuse of pesticides. Thus, the search for alternative cotton culture methods that are pesticide-free (biocotton) and enable customized standard fiber quality should be encouraged. Here we describe a culture of Gossypium hirsutum ("Upland" Cotton) utilizing a greenhouse and hydroponics in which the fibers are morphological similar to conventional cultures and structurally fit into the classical two-phase cellulose I model with 4.19nm crystalline domains surrounded by amorphous regions. These fibers exhibit a single crystalline form of cellulose I-Iß, monoclinic unit cell. Fiber quality bulk analysis shows an improved length, strength, whiteness when compared with soil-based cultures. Finally, we show that our fibers can be spun, used for production of non-woven fabrics and indigo-vat stained demonstrating its potential in industrial and commercial applications.

KEYWORDS:

Cellulose; Cotton; Culture; Fibers; Hydroponics; Textiles

PMID:
26965558
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsb.2016.03.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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