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Eur Respir J. 2016 Jul;48(1):115-24. doi: 10.1183/13993003.01016-2015. Epub 2016 Mar 10.

The independent role of prenatal and postnatal exposure to active and passive smoking on the development of early wheeze in children.

Author information

1
Dept of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece Center for Global Tobacco Control, Dept of Society, Human Development and Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
3
Dept of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, London, UK.
4
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain Dept of Experimental and Health Sciences, University of Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain.
5
School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
6
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain Dept of Experimental and Health Sciences, University of Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain Hospital del Mar Research Institute (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain.
7
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain IB-Salut, Area de Salut de Menorca, Spain.
8
Dept of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna - Alma Mater Studiorum, Bologna, Italy.
9
Inserm, Epidemiology of Allergic and Respiratory diseases (EPAR) Dept, U1136, Medical School Saint-Antoine, Univ6, Sorbonne Universités Paris, Paris, France UPMC, EPAR UMR-S 707, Medical School Saint-Antoine, Univ6, Sorbonne Universités Paris, Paris, France.
10
Team of Environmental Epidemiology applied to Reproduction and Respiratory Health, Inserm and Univ Grenoble Alpes Joint Research Centre (IAB, U823), Grenoble, France.
11
The Generation R Study Group, Dept of Paediatrics, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands Dept of Paediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands Dept of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
12
The Generation R Study Group, Dept of Paediatrics, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
13
Faculty of Medicine, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), San Sebastian, Spain BIODONOSTIA Health Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain Subdirección de Salud Pública de Gipuzkoa; Departamento de Sanidad del Gobierno Vasco, San Sebastian, Spain.
14
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain BIODONOSTIA Health Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain Subdirección de Salud Pública de Gipuzkoa; Departamento de Sanidad del Gobierno Vasco, San Sebastian, Spain.
15
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain Virgen de la Arrixaca Universtiy Hospital, IMIB-Arrixaca Research Institute, Murcia, Spain.
16
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain FISABIO-Universitat de València-Universitat Jaume I Joint Research Unit of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, Valencia, Spain.
17
Dept of Epidemiology, CAPHRI School of Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
18
Paediatric Respiratory Epidemiology, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Bern, Switzerland.
19
Institute for Lung Health, Dept of Infection Immunity and Inflammation, NIHR Leicester Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.
20
Institute of Epidemiology I, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg, Germany.
21
Institute of Epidemiology I, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg, Germany Institute and Outpatient Clinic for Occupational, Social, and Environmental Medicine, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, München, Germany.
22
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Dept of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, CPO Piedmont, Turin, Italy.
23
Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
24
Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
25
Dept of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.
26
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
27
Dept of Dermatology and Allergy Centre, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
28
Dept for Pediatric Pneumology and Immunology, Charité University Medical Centre, Berlin, Germany.
29
Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany Institute of Clinical Epidemiology and Biometry, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.
30
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain Dept of Experimental and Health Sciences, University of Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain Hospital del Mar Research Institute (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain kogevinas@creal.cat.

Abstract

Maternal smoking during pregnancy increases childhood asthma risk, but health effects in children of nonsmoking mothers passively exposed to tobacco smoke during pregnancy are unclear. We examined the association of maternal passive smoking during pregnancy and wheeze in children aged ≤2 years.Individual data of 27 993 mother-child pairs from 15 European birth cohorts were combined in pooled analyses taking into consideration potential confounders.Children with maternal exposure to passive smoking during pregnancy and no other smoking exposure were more likely to develop wheeze up to the age of 2 years (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.03-1.20) compared with unexposed children. Risk of wheeze was further increased by children's postnatal passive smoke exposure in addition to their mothers' passive exposure during pregnancy (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.19-1.40) and highest in children with both sources of passive exposure and mothers who smoked actively during pregnancy (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.59-1.88). Risk of wheeze associated with tobacco smoke exposure was higher in children with an allergic versus nonallergic family history.Maternal passive smoking exposure during pregnancy is an independent risk factor for wheeze in children up to the age of 2 years. Pregnant females should avoid active and passive exposure to tobacco smoke for the benefit of their children's health.

PMID:
26965294
DOI:
10.1183/13993003.01016-2015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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