Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Aesthet Surg J. 2016 Apr;36(4):NP153-62. doi: 10.1093/asj/sjv193.

Platelet-Rich Fibrin Improves the Viability of Diced Cartilage Grafts in a Rabbit Model.

Author information

1
Dr Göral is a Specialist, Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, Manisa Merkezefendi State Hospital, Manisa, Turkey. Dr Aslan is an Assistant Professor, Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, İzmir University School of Medicine, İzmir, Turkey. Dr Küçükzeybek is a Specialist, Department of Pathology, Kâtip Çelebi University Atatürk Training and Research Hospital, İzmir, Turkey. Dr Işık is an Associate Professor, Dr Hoşnuter is a Professor, and Dr Durgun is an Assistant Professor, Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, Kâtip Çelebi University Atatürk Training and Research Hospital, İzmir, Turkey.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Diced cartilage may be wrapped with synthetic or biological materials before grafting to a recipient site. These materials have unique advantages and disadvantages, and a gold standard is not available.

OBJECTIVES:

The authors investigated the effects of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) on the survival of cartilage grafts in a rabbit model.

METHODS:

In this experimental study, diced cartilage pieces from the ears of 9 male rabbits were left unwrapped or were wrapped with PRF, oxidized regenerated cellulose, or fascia. Specimens then were placed into subcutaneous pockets prepared on the backs of the rabbits. The animals were sacrificed 2 months after the procedure, and the grafts were excised for macroscopic and histopathologic examination.

RESULTS:

The cartilage graft wrapped with PRF showed superior viability compared with the cartilage graft wrapped with oxidized regenerated cellulose. No significant differences were found among the other groups. The groups were not significantly different in terms of rates of inflammation, fibrosis, or vascularization.

CONCLUSIONS:

PRF enhances the viability of diced cartilage grafts and should be considered an appropriate biological wrapping material for cartilage grafting.

PMID:
26961991
DOI:
10.1093/asj/sjv193
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center