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BMC Res Notes. 2016 Mar 9;9:151. doi: 10.1186/s13104-016-1949-y.

Perceived feasibility of a primary care intervention for Tobacco Cessation on Prescription targeting disadvantaged groups in Sweden: a qualitative study.

Author information

1
Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägen 18 A, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. anne.leppanen@ki.se.
2
Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägen 18 A, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. biermann.olivia@gmail.com.
3
Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägen 18 A, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. carl.j.sundberg@ki.se.
4
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, von Eulers väg 8, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. carl.j.sundberg@ki.se.
5
Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägen 18 A, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. tanja.tomson@ki.se.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is a lack of scientific evidence on how socioeconomically disadvantaged tobacco users can be reached with tobacco cessation interventions in Swedish primary healthcare (PHC). In this setting other lifestyle interventions are available by prescription, and there is the potential to develop a similar tool for tobacco cessation. The aim of this study was thus to explore the perceived feasibility and optimal design of Tobacco Cessation on Prescription (TCP) in PHC, targeting disadvantaged groups in Sweden.

METHODS:

This qualitative study is based on semi-structured interviews with 32 participants including (1) three experts in lifestyle interventions on prescription, (2) 14 healthcare providers and (3) 15 clients from three PHC centres in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas in Stockholm where tobacco use is high. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The manifest content of the transcripts was analysed according to a modified conventional approach to content analysis.

RESULTS:

The interviewees proposed that TCP should include a template comprising the client's information, evidence-based tobacco cessation options and choices for follow-up. They also suggested including information about the benefits of tobacco cessation, as well as empowerment and planning support tools. The participants also commented that other measures for tobacco cessation could be included on the prescription. From the clients' point of view, the perceived advantages of TCP were often linked to an emotional meaning (e.g. increased motivation to quit tobacco use, sign of support from the healthcare system to seek care for tobacco cessation). For providers, advantages with TCP were frequently related to a practical meaning (e.g. improved documentation and facilitation of tobacco cessation treatment). The disadvantages identified were mainly connected with the future implementation of TCP (e.g. low self-efficacy among clients and providers).

CONCLUSIONS:

TCP was perceived to be a useful tool for both clients and providers, potentially facilitating a structured and effective approach to tobacco cessation in PHC, and targeting disadvantaged groups. More research is needed to develop the prescription and investigate its effectiveness and cost-effectiveness compared to current strategies for tobacco cessation in a PHC setting.

PMID:
26961759
PMCID:
PMC4784339
DOI:
10.1186/s13104-016-1949-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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